Cincinnati’s well being commissioner says there’s ‘high quality tuning’ to do after first mass vaccination clinics

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Vaccine distribution in Ohio is picking up speed. With the addition of Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine, the introduction of mass vaccination sites across the state, and expanded eligibility for Ohioans who want the shot, vaccine distributors can get more shots in the arms than at any point in the pandemic. New challenges are associated with enlargement. WLWT spoke to Dr. Melba Moore, Cincinnati’s health commissioner, on issues uncovered in the city’s first attempts to run mass vaccination clinics. The Cincinnati Health Department has held the first mass vaccination clinics in the city for the past few days, including the largest to date on Saturday at the Duke Energy Center. Moore admits it is time to “fine tune”. The health department was ready to vaccinate 5,000 people Saturday at the Duke Energy Center. It was able to pre-register and vaccinate 4,177 people. “So we came up short,” she said. I know there was a call to the media on Friday night. “Going forward, Moore admitted that the department needs to communicate about vaccination options sooner. WLWT received concerns from viewers that the city’s Department of Health website and online vaccine registration are not user-friendly and that there has been some glitch. The website appears to be out of date in a few areas, including the Vaccine Information and Registration page, which starts Monday evening pointing out possible weather disruptions on February 11 vaccine appointments. In addition, the health department is aware of complaints with various aspects of the website and is working to address these concerns and to make the website and the registration process easier to navigate. “Tell us what isn’t working. We want to hear that feedback,” she said. “This is always very helpful for us to see what the concerns are so that we can make these adjustments.” Some people expressed frustration that vaccines provided in the mass vaccination clinics operated by the Cincinnati Health Department were only available to people who live or work. The Hamilton County Health Department, as well as many neighboring health departments, vaccinate anyone who is under Ohio licensing requirements is entitled regardless of his place of residence. WLWT asked Moore about this decision and whether she had considered changing the guideline. “We’re considering changing that,” she said. “Because we remember we had a limited supply of vaccines that we worked with. So you see how you start small and build yourself up and work your way up? We look at this and plan to just watch it open If people live in Hamilton County, they can get vaccinated in town. We’re looking at this now. “With Ohio’s growing immunization eligibility, Moore said she was optimistic. “We’re almost there. It’s like a little glimmer of light. You can see it,” she said. She is also confident to know that the city recorded only 12 new cases of COVID-19 as of Monday.

Vaccine distribution in Ohio is picking up speed. With the addition of Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine, the introduction of mass vaccination sites across the state, and expanded eligibility for Ohioans who want the shot, vaccine distributors can get more shots in the arms than at any point in the pandemic.

New challenges are associated with enlargement.

WLWT spoke to Dr. Melba Moore, Cincinnati’s health commissioner, on issues uncovered in the city’s first attempts to run mass vaccination clinics.

The Cincinnati Health Department has held the first mass vaccination clinics in the city in the past few days, including the largest to date on Saturday at the Duke Energy Center. Moore admits it is time to “fine tune”.

The health department was ready to vaccinate 5,000 people at the Duke Energy Center on Saturday. It was able to pre-register and vaccinate 4,177 people.

“So we came up short,” she said. “We didn’t put enough pressure on the information. I know there was a call to the media on Friday evening.”

In the future, Moore admitted that the department needs to communicate about vaccination options sooner.

WLWT received concerns from viewers that the city’s Department of Health website and online vaccine registration are not user-friendly, and that there has been some glitch.

The website appears to be out of date in some areas, including the vaccine information and registration page, which will warn of possible weather disruptions on February 11 vaccine appointments starting Monday evening.

According to Moore, the health department is aware of complaints related to various aspects of the website and is working to address those concerns and make it easier to navigate the website and sign up.

“Tell us what isn’t working. We want to hear that feedback,” she said. “This is always very helpful for us to hear what the concern is so that we can make these adjustments.”

Some people expressed frustration that vaccines provided in the mass vaccination clinics operated by the Cincinnati Health Department were only available to people who live or work within city limits.

The Hamilton County Health Department, as well as many neighboring health departments, vaccinate anyone eligible under Ohio’s licensing requirements, regardless of where they live.

WLWT asked Moore about this decision and whether she had considered changing the guideline.

“We’re considering changing that,” she said. “Because we remember we had a limited supply of vaccines that we worked with. So see how you start small and build up and work up? We’re looking at this and planning it to make it easy so open. ” that people can be vaccinated. If they live in Hamilton County they can be vaccinated in town. We’ll look at this now. “

With the growing allowance for vaccines in Ohio, Moore is optimistic.

“We’re almost there. It’s like a little glimmer of light. You can see it,” she said.

She is also confident to know that the city recorded only 12 new cases of COVID-19 as of Monday.