Cincinnati Sikh leaders go to Indianapolis to consolation households of taking pictures victims

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Of the eight lives lost in the Indianapolis shootings, four were from the city’s Sikh community. Aasees Kaur spoke to WLWT by phone while in Indianapolis comforting families who had lost loved ones in the shootings. Kaur lives in Cincinnati and is a member of the national organization “The Sikh Coalition”. She does civil and human rights work for the organization and ensures that the civil liberties and religious rights of Sikhs are not violated. Kaur said the Sikh religion is rooted in the practice of unity and love for all. She said Sikhs view everyone is the same. “There’s a bit of strength to knowing that so many people are ready to stand shoulder to shoulder with you to help you move forward,” said Kaur. Those who were there on Friday were in shock and disbelief. “It’s difficult. It’s very difficult to understand that this can happen to the community. I’m trying to digest it, that really? That happened?” Maninder Walia said. Kaur says while family and friends continue to mourn, they and others will stay there to help prepare the funeral. “That way, they can focus on coming to terms with what happened so unfairly, and you know they have support in the community.” Kaur said: The Sikh community in Indianapolis is holding a special service for its members who were lost in the Saturday morning shootings.

Of the eight people killed in the Indianapolis shootings, four were from the city’s Sikh community.

Aasees Kaur spoke to WLWT on the phone while in Indianapolis comforting families who had lost loved ones in the shootings.

Kaur lives in Cincinnati and is a member of the national organization “The Sikh Coalition”. She does civil and human rights work for the organization and ensures that the civil liberties and religious rights of Sikhs are not violated.

Kaur said the Sikh religion is rooted in the practice of unity and love for all. She said Sikhs view everyone is the same.

“There is a little strength in knowing that so many people are ready to stand shoulder to shoulder with you to move forward,” said Kaur.

Those who were there on Friday were shocked and incredulous.

“It’s difficult. It’s very difficult to understand that this can happen to the community. I’m trying to digest it, really? Did that happen?” Maninder Walia said.

Kaur says while family and friends continue to mourn, they and others will stay there to help prepare the funeral.

“So you can focus on processing what happened so unfairly and you know that you have support from within the community,” said Kaur.

The Indianapolis Sikh community is holding a special service for its members who were lost in the shootings on Saturday morning.