Who’s holding police accountability rallies in Toledo?

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Rally members are calling for an end to qualified immunity. Policies they say protect government officials, including the police, from being held responsible for wrongdoing.

TOLEDO, Ohio – With violence locally and across the country already in 2021, Toledoans are gathering to rally for change and call for action.

Nearly two dozen people went to Secor Road to rally for police accountability for a rally for change. All of this after the recent Toledo, Minnesota and Chicago shootings and when the Derek Chauvin Trial is in its final stages. ‘

CONNECTED: Testimony in Derek Chauvin’s murder trial completed, final arguments for Monday

The rally was organized by the Toledo Community Solidarity Response Network.

“The number of black and brown people who die from racism continues to be astonishing,” said rally driver Rebecca Gauchet.

The organizers of the rally say that recent death and recent violence are linked.

They are calling for an end to qualified immunity. Qualified immunity is a policy that protects government officials from being held responsible for wrongdoing.

CONNECTED: Former officer Kim Potter was arrested and charged with second degree manslaughter in Daunte Wright’s death

“A common issue we see is lack of accountability. Even with police officers here in Toledo,” said activist Julian Mack of the Toledo Community Solidarity Response Network.

Mack says the nation needs systemic change and equality.

“We’re fed up with the bodies adding up, we’re fed up with the hashtags, the state-sponsored terrorism sponsored by the people who are supposed to protect and serve us,” said Mack.

CONNECTED: Chicago publishes a body camera video of police fatalities shot at a 13-year-old boy

Advances in social justice will not be made overnight or in the next few months, Mack said. However, he hopes that changes will gradually be made that will have lasting effects.

“We can’t stop now because the murders don’t stop. Death doesn’t stop. So we keep getting out until changes occur,” said Gauchet.