Cincinnati departments testing nonlethal machine to assist officers use much less pressure

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A new innovative tool could help police officers navigate tense encounters without deadly violence. The question is why are more departments not taking advantage of this. WLWT spoke to local law enforcement agencies about BolaWrap.Wrap Technologies, which is selling the device, and touting it as a tool that “safely and humanely withholds resistance from people remotely without relying on pain compliance tools”. A BolaWrap is similar in size to a Taser. With one click, the device, which supports an officer with a laser in aiming, shoots out an 8-foot Kevlar rope. The rope wraps around a motif and hooks on each end are designed to snap onto the person’s clothing. The device is considered non-lethal and is designed to be fired on a person’s torso or legs. Although we have not found successful missions in our region, videos from law enforcement agencies across the country show the potential of BolaWrap. Minnesota police used the device to safely restrain a man who fled a hospital while in a mental condition. Police in Beaufort, South Carolina, safely detained a man armed with knives. Police in St. Cloud, Florida have successfully arrested a man who may have been suicidal. His mother warned the officers that he was about to commit suicide by a police officer. “The police have evolved. Society has evolved. We train in de-escalation every year, and our MPs use it every day,” said Lt. Philip Ridgell, Boone County Sheriff’s Office Spokesman. “We are considering the BolaWrap because it gives our MPs a tool that they can use in the field instead of dealing with a passively resistant issue.” Country. “Right now we have an emotional crisis on average every 12 hours,” said Ridgell. He said his department is looking for innovative ways to protect passively resistant subjects and resolve situations with less violence. The Cincinnati police recently tested the devices. A spokesman told the WLWT that approximately 100 officers were given BolaWraps to test on site for about six months. There were no missions. Chef Eliot Isaac loved the non-lethal tool when it was used on him in a demo last summer. The demo was sparked by a tragedy in the West End when a Cincinnati police officer inadvertently fired a bullet from his shotgun instead of a beanbag chair. The officer missed a man who was suffering from a mental crisis. Just recently, CPD announced to WLWT that it had decided to purchase a handful of BolaWraps, which are $ 1,000 each for the SWAT team. The Hamilton County Sheriff’s office is also preparing to test the device. Sheriff Charmaine McGuffey has a few questions the department needs answers. “Will it be effective enough for us to spend that kind of money because it will be quite expensive to equip a 900-person department,” she said. About 500 MPs in the sheriff’s office are assigned to prison services or patrols. It would cost half a million dollars to equip each alternate with a BolaWrap. In comparison, the average body camera costs anywhere from $ 400 to $ 700. “We’re evaluating it to see if it works in the detained environment, which is very unlikely because everything is so closed there,” said McGuffey. “We never know what situation we’re going to encounter and people are going through a crisis. People are doing this all the time.” Former Cincinnati Police Chief Tom Streicher thinks BolaWrap is a breeze. He is a consultant for a company that works with Wrap Technologies. “Why do we want to use force when we don’t have to use force? That is the simple question that needs to be asked,” said Streicher. “As soon as they demonstrated the device, the lightbulb in my head went on and I thought, ‘Here it is. My God. This is the future of policing.'” Streicher believes the widely used device could prevent tragedy, and it does worth every financial investment. “When I’m the chief of police, I urge us to promote the use of this new technology (17) and minimize the risk for everyone involved,” he said. “If you want to make sure that the technology is being used by the agency and is being used properly, give that technology to every single official who is there.”

A new innovative tool could help police officers navigate tense encounters without deadly violence. The question is why are more departments not taking advantage of this.

WLWT spoke to the local police authorities about the BolaWrap.

Wrap Technologies, which sells the device, touts it as a tool that “safely and humanely withholds resistance from people remotely without relying on pain compliance tools”.

A BolaWrap is similar in size to a taser. With one click, the device, which supports an officer with a laser in aiming, shoots out an 8-foot Kevlar rope. The rope wraps around a motif and hooks on each end are designed to snap onto the person’s clothing.

The device is considered non-lethal and is designed to be fired on a person’s torso or legs.

Although we have not found successful missions in our region, videos from law enforcement agencies across the country show the potential of BolaWrap. Minnesota police used the device to safely restrain a man who fled a hospital while in a mental condition. Police in Beaufort, South Carolina, safely detained a man armed with knives. Police in St. Cloud, Florida have successfully arrested a man who may have been suicidal. His mother warned the officers that he was about to commit suicide by a police officer.

“The police have evolved. Society has evolved. We train in de-escalation every year, and our MPs use it every day,” said Lt. Philip Ridgell, Boone County Sheriff’s Office Spokesman. “We are considering the BolaWrap because it gives our MPs a tool that they can use in the field rather than dealing with a passively resilient subject.”

Calls related to mental health and the drug crisis are growing for departments across the country.

“Right now, an average of one emotional crisis every 12 hours,” said Ridgell.

He said his department is looking for innovative ways to protect passively resistant subjects and resolve situations with less violence.

The Cincinnati police recently tested the devices. A spokesman told the WLWT that approximately 100 officers were given BolaWraps to test on site for about six months. There were no deployments.

Chef Eliot Isaac loved the non-lethal tool when it was used on him in a demo last summer. The demo was sparked by a tragedy in the West End when a Cincinnati police officer inadvertently fired a bullet from his shotgun instead of a beanbag chair.

The officer missed a man who was suffering from a mental crisis.

Just recently, CPD announced to WLWT that it had decided to purchase a handful of BolaWraps, which are $ 1,000 each for the SWAT team.

The Hamilton County Sheriff’s office is also preparing to test the device.

Sheriff Charmaine McGuffey has a few questions for the department to answer.

“Will it be effective enough for us to spend that kind of money because it will be quite expensive to equip a 900-person department,” she said.

About 500 MPs in the sheriff’s office are assigned to prison services or patrols. It would cost half a million dollars to equip each alternate with a BolaWrap. In comparison, the average body camera costs anywhere from $ 400 to $ 700.

“We’re evaluating it to see if it works in the detained environment, which is very unlikely because everything is so closed there,” said McGuffey. “We never know what situation we’re going to encounter and people are going through a crisis. People are doing this all the time.”

Former Cincinnati Police Chief Tom Streicher thinks BolaWrap is a breeze. He is a consultant for a company that works with Wrap Technologies.

“Why do we want to use force when we don’t have to use force? That is the simple question that needs to be asked,” said Streicher. “As soon as they demonstrated the device, the lightbulb in my head went on and I thought, ‘Here it is. My God. This is the future of policing.'”

Streicher believes the widespread device could prevent tragedy, and that makes it worth any financial investment.

“When I’m the chief of police, I urge us to promote the use of this new technology (17) and minimize the risk for everyone involved,” he said. “If you want to make sure that the technology is being used by the agency and is being used properly, give that technology to every single official who is there.”